Join us as we submerge beneath the ocean’s surface to explore various sunken vessels, now frozen in time.

 

CHIEN TONG WRECK
Image by Els Van Den Borre
Chien Tong was a 52m-long Taiwanese long-line fishing boat that now serves as a living space for marine life beneath the waters of St. Eustatius in the Caribbean, Netherlands. The Chien Tong was purposefully sunk in 2004 and now sits at a depth of 22m, offering divers a great post to view turtles.

KEMBU MARU WRECK
Image by Brandi Mueller
This Japanese ship sank during World War II. It is located in the Lagoon of Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, among dozens of other ship wrecks and several aircrafts. The ship is thought to have been carrying aviation fuel which caused a massive explosion when it was bombed.

GIANNIS D WRECK
Image by Olivia Anderson
Originally a 99.5m-long cargo ship built in Imabari, Japan in 1969, the Giannis D reached its final resting place in Abu Nuhas, Egypt in 1983 after the ship deviated off course and collided with a reef while transporting cargo to Jeddeh, Saudi Arabia. The ship now sits at a 27m depth and has become a popular choice for shipwreck diving in the Red Sea.

STENAPA WRECK
Image by Els Van Den Borre
A sunken barge, a tugboat and the hull of a ship are now safe havens for many juvenile fishes. At night, huge turtles gather here to sleep and corals open their polyps to feed. The tugboat is like a firework of colours at night.

SS THISTLEGORM
Image by Raffaele Livornese
At a depth of around 30m, the 128m-long SS Thistlegorm is one of the most famous shipwreck dive sites in the world. The Merchant Navy ship was built in 1940 and sank in 1941 off the coast of Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, after a German bomber struck it. This is one of the locomotives that was being transported by the ship and was hurled by the explosion of ammunition in the hold during the German air attack.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE TO READ: